Leading Point have joined the SME Climate Commitment

 

 

What is The SME Climate Hub?

The SME Climate Hub is a global collection of SMEs (small-medium enterprises) that have commited to halve emissions by 2030 and become net-zero by 2050. Included in this commitment is to report on progress yearly. 

The SME Climate Hub is a network that supports SMEs on this vital net-zero journey.

 

Why we joined:

Leading Point is pleased to announce that we have joined the UN-backed SME Climate Commitment and formally committed to being net-zero in carbon emissions by 2030 (in advance of the minimum target of 2050).

We have joined the community of UK businesses tackling climate change through the SME Climate Hub. With their support, we will understand, track, and make strategic, impactful emission reductions to achieve our target of being a net-zero business by 2030.

Leading Point is committed to having a responsible, sustainable, and transparent operating model. We are excited to collaborate with other businesses on this scheme, and implement a business climate strategy using the tools created by Normative, CDP, Business for Social Responsibility (BSR™), and the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL).

We are proud to be taking the lead on climate action with the SME Climate Hub community and will be fully transparent with our progress.

 

Words from our Founding Partner and Chief Sustainability Officer, Thushan Kumaraswamy:

“Committing to a net-zero target is the right thing to do for the planet. It is also a bold statement for a growing startup. I want Leading Point to be at the forefront for fintechs who are making a climate change difference. As we grow, our impact on the environment naturally increases. I am excited to find the best ways to mitigate those impacts and share those findings with our peers.”

 

Words from our ESG Associate, Maria King:

Climate change presents both potential risks and potential opportunities for businesses. Small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) account for 90% of business worldwide. However, only a small portion of these report on their emissions due to costs and complexity.”

 

Who we are:

Leading Point is a fintech specialising in digital operating models. We are revolutionising the way operating models are created and managed through our proprietary technology, modeller™, and expert services delivered by our team of specialists.

 

 


What COP26 means for Financial Services

 

Many have proclaimed COP26 as a failure, with funding falling short, loose wording and non-binding commitments. However, despite the doom and gloom, there was a bright spot; the UK’s finance industry.

Trillions need to be invested to achieve the 1.5 degrees target, but governments alone do not have the funds to achieve this. Alternative sources of finance must be found, and private investment needs to be encouraged on all fronts to, ‘go green’. Looking at supply-side energy alone, the IPPC estimates that up to $3.8 trillion needs to be mobilised annually to achieve the transition to net-zero by 2050.

The UK led from the front in green finance, introducing plans to become the world’s first net-zero aligned financial centre. New Treasury rules for financial institutions, listed on the London Stock Exchange, mean that companies will have to create and publish net-zero transition plans by 2023, although the full details are yet to be announced. These plans will be evaluated by a new institution, but crucially, are not mandatory. The adjudicator of the investment plans will be investors. Although some argue the regulation could be stronger, just like national climate targets, once there are institutions publishing their alignment with net-zero, there is a level of accountability that can be scrutinised and a platform for comparison which encourages competition. Anything stronger could have pushed investment firms into less-regulated exchanges.

Encouragingly, the private sector showed strong engagement, with nearly 500 global financial services firms agreeing to align $130 trillion — around 40% of the world’s financial assets — with the goals set out in the Paris Agreement, including limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

From large multinational companies, to small local businesses, the summit provided greater clarity on how climate policies and regulations will shape the future business environment. The progress made, on phasing out fossil fuel subsidies and coal investments, was a clear signal to the global market about the future viability of fossil fuels. It will now be more difficult to gain funding to expand existing or build new coal mines. Over time, this adjustment will have wider impacts on the funding of other polluting industries.

This new framework will give the private sector the confidence and certainty it needs to invest in green technology and green energy. Renewable energy is already the cheapest form of energy in 2/3 of the world. This reassurance will be crucial in driving the economies of scale we need, within the renewable energy industry.

A truly sustainable future is still a long way off. The private sector will still invest in fossil fuels, new regulations will cause challenges, and ESG remains optional; but initial signals from COP26 show that the future of the world is looking green.

 

By Maria King — ESG Associate at Leading Point

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who we are:

Leading Point is a fintech specialising in digital operating models. We are revolutionising the way operating models are created and managed through our proprietary technology, modellr™, and expert services delivered by our team of specialists.